Midwest Theory Day
Next Meeting: Dec. 6, 2008, 10am-5:00pm, Fine Barr Forum, Allen Center, Northwestern U., Evanston IL.

[Home] [Synopsis] [Registration] [CFP] [Schedule] [Invited Talk] [Abstracts] [Accommodations] [Organizers]

Synopsis

The 57th Midwest Theory Day will be hosted by the Theory Group in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and cosponsored by the Math Center at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University on Saturday, December 6th. There will be a number of contributed talks and an invited talk by Abraham Flaxman. Anyone interested in theoretical computer science is welcome to attend. There is no registration fee, lunch is provided, and the talks are scheduled so that from many locations in the Midwest it is often possible to come, attend all of the talks, and return home all in a day. For those wishing to stay into the evening, arrangements for a banquet dinner are made at a local restaurant, each person paying for his or her own meal.

Next Meeting: Dec. 6, 2008, 10am-5:00pm, Fine Barr Forum, Allen Center, Northwestern U., Evanston IL.

Registration

The organizers thank you for registering by sending email with your name and affiliation to mtd.reg@gmail.com by Dec. 3rd. There is no cost for attending.

Call for Participation

There are usually six or seven contributed talks and often an invited talk. There is no program committee and there are no proceedings. Anyone willing to talk may do so. The atmosphere is relaxed and informal and so is an excellent forum for graduate students to get experience giving a talk. If you would like to give a talk, send email to mtd.reg@gmail.com. Please include the title of your talk and your affiliation in your email.

Schedule

10:00-10:30 Arrivals
10:00-10:30 Talk: Saad Sheikh "Qualitative methods for Sibling Reconstruction from genotyping data"
10:30-11:00 Talk: Louis Ibarra "The clique-separator graph and developing a dynamic graph algorithm to recognize interval graphs"
11:00-11:30 Coffee Break
11:30-12:30 Intived: Abraham Flaxman "Theoretical Computer Science for Global Health"
12:30-1:30 Lunch (provided)
1:30-2:00 Talk: Hemanta Maji "Complexity of Multiparty Computation"
2:00-2:30 Talk: Nicole Immorlica "The Role of Compatibility in Technology Diffusion on Social Networks"
2:30-3:00 Talk:Siddarth Barman "Packing multiway cuts in capacitated graphs"
3:00-3:30 Coffee Break
3:30-4:00 Talk: Xiaohua Xu "An Improved Approximation Algorithm for Data Aggregation in Multi-hop Wireless Sensor Networks"
4:00-4:30 Talk: Guangwu Xu "Restricted Isometry Properties and Compressed Sensing"
4:30-5:00 Talk: Xufei Mao "Closing the Gap in the Multicast Capacity of Hybrid Networks"
5:00-5:30 Talk: Benjamin Moseley "Online Scheduling to Minimize the Maximum Delay Factor"
6:30-8:30 Dinner at Mt. Everest at 630 Church St., Evanston (not provided).

Invited Talk

Speaker: Abraham Flaxman (Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Seattle, WA.)

Title: Theoretical Computer Science for Global Health

Abstract: Spanning Trees, Random Graphs, Markov Chains, and Solving Linear System of Equations: these bread-and-butter concepts from CS theory all have important roles to play in understanding global health. In this talk, I'll give an overview of the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD), and describe some of its many algorithmic challenges. GBD is a systematic effort to produce estimates of how 200+ diseases, injuries, and risk factors impact people around the world. Naturally, there are a lot of numbers to crunch. But you may be surprised to learn how many of the relevant numbers are missing. And the numbers we do have often don't add up. This is where we need computational tools, and I hope to leverage research from probability theory, machine learning, and possibly even combinatorial Hodge theory. I'll give you a quick tour of the interdisciplinary area that is Health Metrics.

Bio: For the last 3 months, Abraham Flaxman has been working as a post-doc at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, which does global health research as part of the Public Health School at the University of Washington. Before that, he was a graduate student at CMU and a post-doc in the Microsoft Research Theory Group. He maintains a weblog about Math, CS, and OR applications to Health Metrics at http://healthyalgorithms.wordpress.com/.

Abstracts

Siddarth Barman (University of Wisconsin, Madison), "Packing multiway cuts in capacitated graphs": Louis Ibarra (DePaul U), "The clique-separator graph and developing a dynamic graph algorithm to recognize interval graphs": Nicole Immorlica (Northwestern U.), "The Role of Compatibility in Technology Diffusion on Social Networks" [paper.pdf]: Hemanta Maji (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "Complexity of Multiparty Computation": Xufei Mao (Illinois Institute of Technology), "Closing the Gap in the Multicast Capacity of Hybrid Networks" Benjamin Moseley (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "Online Scheduling to Minimize the Maximum Delay Factor": Saad Sheikh (U. of Illinois, Chicago), "Qualitative methods for Sibling Reconstruction from genotyping data": Guangwu Xu (U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee), "Restricted Isometry Properties and Compressed Sensing": Xiaohua Xu (Illinois Institute of Technology), "An Improved Approximation Algorithm for Data Aggregation in Multi-hop Wireless Sensor Networks":

Accommodations

If you are staying the night in Evanston, you may choose from one of the following hotels for discounted room rates. If you would like to share a room and want to be connected to a roommate, email mtd.reg@gmail.com with "ROOMMATE MATCH" in the subject line.

Local Information

The 57th Midwest Theory Day will be held in the Fine Barr Forum of the Allen Center at Northwestern U.

Dinner will be at Mt. Everest at 630 Church St., Evanston, IL 60201. See map, below.


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Parking: Parking on Northwestern's campus is free on weekends.

Organizers

Jason HartlineNorthwestern U.
John RogersDePaul U.